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Currants and Gooseberries

“The berries of currants are small, but potent. They have four times the vitamin C as oranges and black currant has twice as much antioxidants as blueberries. Currant berries are borne in long dangling clusters of gem-like little berries.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to pre-order your copy of the more »

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Bananas and Plantains

“Bananas and plantains are large-leaved, tropical, evergreen plants grown in the humid tropics and subtropics throughout the world. Banana fruits which are starchy and need to be cooked before eating are called plantains, those that are sweet and eaten fresh are called bananas. Delicious and extremely popular, bananas are the fourth largest fruit crop in the world after tomatoes, grapes, and oranges.” Excerpted from “What’s more »

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Chestnuts

“Chinese chestnut, Castanea mollissima, is the best, most disease resistant chestnut for home gardens. Japanese, C. crenata, and European, C. sativa, chestnuts can sometimes be grown in the west where chestnut blight is less problematic and where winter temperatures are more mild. But east of the Rockies the Chinese chestnut is the best choice.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff more »

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Avocado

“A large, tropical, evergreen tree to 60 feet tall the avocado hails originally from south central Mexico. In cultivation for centuries by the peoples of the new world from Peru to the Rio Grande, the avocado is highly prized today for its savory, not sweet, fruit which, like olives, contains valuable oil. A heart-healthy addition to your diet, avocado contains cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fatty acids and more »

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Apricots

“Apricots have been cultivated for at least 3,000 years in India, probably longer in China where it is thought to have originated. It’s been grown from antiquity in the middle east and was originally thought to have come from Armenia, thus the name Prunus armeniaca.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here more »

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Japanese Plums

“The largest plum fruits are Japanese plums. Sweet-tart and very juicy, they generally are eaten fresh rather than dried. Japanese plums flower in very early spring and can be damaged by late frosts. These trees also grow to 15 feet tall but are more wide spreading than European plums.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, more »

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Kiwis

The delicious kiwis are: “large, woody, twining vines to 30 feet tall that are dioecious, that is, vines are either male or female. Male vines only have male flowers that produce pollen but bear no fruits. Female vines only have female flowers that produce fruits but produce no pollen. You must have a female vine in order to get any fruit, and you must have more »

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Sweet Cherries

“Plump, glossy cherries may be nearly black, dark red, red, yellow with a red blush, or yellow. Flavor varies by cultivar. Usually not very tart, sweet cherries are generally eaten fresh off the tree.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to pre-order your copy of the book.

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Blueberries

“Everybody should have a few blueberry bushes. They’re easy to grow, loaded with healthful antioxidants, and homegrown organic blueberries taste way better than store-bought ones. And besides, they’re native American plants and they belong in your garden.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to pre-order your copy of the book.

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Oranges

“It can take an orange tree up to 10 months or more from flower to mature fruit. Most orange cultivars will have harvestable fruit by late autumn or winter but some won’t mature till spring. The fruit hangs on the tree for weeks, or even months, in good condition. You can harvest fruit from your trees for as long as 10 months of the year more »

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