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Watermelons

“There are many different watermelon cultivars available with fruits that vary in size, flesh color, days to maturity, and whether they have seeds or are seedless. One interesting heirloom strain is called ‘Moon and Stars’ where the fruits and leaves are polkadotted with bright yellow, round spots.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. more »

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Walnuts

“Pecan  and walnut are related trees in the same botanical family, the Juglandaceae. Both of them are monoecious with dozens of tiny male flowers in four inch long dangly catkins and female flowers in small upright clusters of three to five at the branch tips.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here more »

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Persimmons

“The scientific name of this genus, Diospyros, comes to us from ancient Greek and refers to divine fruit, fruit of the gods, or food of the gods. People who know and love this fruit certainly agree. The divine flavor is complex, sweet and a little tangy, and the texture like jelly. You wait till they’re fully ripe and soft then you cut them open and more »

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Pomegranate

“What makes pomegranate flowers unusual is their size, to two inches wide, and their color, a glowing neon vermillion. Flower color varies by cultivar and can be orange, yellow, pink, or white, but the typical color is an intense orange-red. The flowers have five to seven crinkly, crepe-like petals and are very attractive to hummingbirds.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David more »

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Pears

“Unlike apples, which are ready to eat right off the tree, pears are tricky. They have to go through the ripening process off the tree. If you let them hang on the tree till they’re fully ripe they turn to brown mush from the inside out.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click more »

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Passionfruit (Lilikoi)

“Each seed of the passionfruit is surrounded by an aril, a globule of orange liquid that is strongly aromatic, sweet/tart, and absolutely mouth-wateringly delicious. Cut the fruit in half and scoop out the seeds with a spoon into a strainer. Strain out the seeds and preserve the orange liquid. Use the fragrant juice to make all manner of wonderful edibles, such as lilikoi cheesecake or more »

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Peaches

“The peach covers itself with large, pink, showy flowers in early spring. If the weather cooperates and the bees are active there will be baskets full of luscious fruit in summer. The flesh of the fruit either clings to the pit, called a cling peach, or separates easily from the pit, called a free-stone peach.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David more »

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Orchard Overview

“Right from the start you need to know about temperature, soil, light and water needs for plants you want to grow. With few exceptions, fruits and nuts are perennials. You commit to these plants for years, so choosing the right plant, putting it in the right place, and selecting the best cultivar for your climate and taste is really important.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With more »

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Mulberries

“Black mulberry fruit has a combination of sweetness and tartness mixed with intense flavor that explodes on the tongue. Other mulberries may be less flavorful, or merely sweet but not tart, so it pays to search out specific cultivars known to have excellent tasting fruit.”  Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here more »

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Olives

“Their gnarled trunks and silvery gray leaves grant olive trees a commanding presence in your landscape. In addition to their great beauty as ornamentals they bear an extremely valuable fruit which yields, when cold pressed, the rich, healthful, and delicious extra virgin olive oil so necessary in contemporary cuisine.”  Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, more »

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