Posts Tagged organic

Marijuana

Our newest book, number five in the “What’s Wrong With My…” series, is all about cannabis care with safe organic solutions to every problem. The book is being published by Ten Speed Press and will be available everywhere in August, 2017. Whether you have 2 or 3 plants or hundreds of plants, whether your intended use is medical or recreational, it is imperative to avoid more »

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Breaking News

Breaking News: We are pleased to announce the release of What’s Wrong With My Houseplant? from Timber Press, late January, 2016. Click photo for more…

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Potted Lemons

“Our ‘Improved Meyer’ lemon is perfectly happy it its pot and produces fruit for us every year. Because lemon requires very little heat compared to other citrus, especially grapefruit, you will easily obtain edible fruit from container grown lemons. And besides, the plants are handsome, the foliage is lovely, and the fragrance of their flowers is heavenly, all of which makes them desirable houseplants that more »

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Peach Flowers

“The peach is a highly ornamental small tree with beautiful large pink flowers in spring and attractive yellow/orange foliage color in the fall. The delicious fruit might be considered a bonus in addition to the landscape value of the tree.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to order your copy of more »

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Apple Scab

“Brown corky spots occur on fruit and brown spots develop on leaves. Fruit may become deformed. Apple scab.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to order your copy of the book .

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Mason Bees

“Aside from bad weather, too few bees can cause poor pollination. Honeybee colonies are dying due to colony collapse disorder (CCD). For insurance, create habitat for native solitary bees like the blue orchard mason bee. They are extremely efficient pollinators of numerous crops. Nest boxes for these and other native bees are available at most garden centers and on the internet.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong more »

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Beneficial Insects

“Flies are members of the order Diptera, which means they have only two wings instead of four. This group includes many beneficial insects such as syrphid or hover flies, and tachinid flies, both of which are predators of destructive insect pests.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here to order your copy more »

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Strawberries

“Strawberries are highly ornamental and are welcome additions to any landscape. Shallow rooted, they find use as an excellent ground cover anywhere. Possibly the easiest of all fruit bearing plants to grow in a container you can easily accommodate strawberry plants in pots on your deck or patio.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, more »

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Watermelons

“There are many different watermelon cultivars available with fruits that vary in size, flesh color, days to maturity, and whether they have seeds or are seedless. One interesting heirloom strain is called ‘Moon and Stars’ where the fruits and leaves are polkadotted with bright yellow, round spots.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. more »

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Walnuts

“Pecan  and walnut are related trees in the same botanical family, the Juglandaceae. Both of them are monoecious with dozens of tiny male flowers in four inch long dangly catkins and female flowers in small upright clusters of three to five at the branch tips.” Excerpted from “What’s Wrong With My Fruit Garden?” by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth. Timber Press, December, 2013. Click here more »

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